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Momentum continues to build for companies who are migrating their workloads to the cloud, across all industries, even highly regulated industries such as Financial Services, Health Care, and Government. And it’s not just for small companies and startups. Most of the largest companies in the world – we’re talking Fortune 500 here – are adopting rapid and aggressive strategies for migrating and managing their workloads in the cloud. While the benefits of migrating workloads to the cloud are seemingly obvious (cost savings, of course), the “hidden” benefits exist in the fact that the cloud allows businesses to be more nimble, enabling business users with faster, more powerful, and more scalable business capabilities than they’ve ever had before.

So what do enterprises care about when managing workloads in the cloud? More importantly, what should you care about? Let’s assume, for the sake of argument, that your workloads are already in the cloud – that you’ve adopted a sound methodology for migrating your workloads to the cloud.

GraphRaise your expectations I would submit that enterprises should raise their expectations from “standard” workload management. Why? Because the cloud provides a more flexible, powerful, and scalable paradigm than the typical application-running-in-a-data-center-on-a-bunch-of-servers model. Once your workloads are in the cloud, the basic requirements for managing them are not dissimilar to what you’d expect today for managing workloads on-premise or in a data center.

 

The basics include:

  • Service Levels: Basic service levels are still just that – basic service levels – Availability, response time, capacity, support, monitoring, etc. So what’s different in the cloud world? You should pay particular attention to ensuring your personal data is protected in your hosted cloud service.
  • Support: Like any hosting capability, support is very important to consider. Does your provider provide online, call center, dedicated, and/or a combo platter of all of these?
    • Security: Ensure that your provider has robust security measures in place and mechanisms to preserve your applications and data
  • Compliance: You should ensure your cloud provider is in compliance with the standards for your specific industry. Privacy, security and quality are principal compliance areas to evaluate and ensure are being provided.

 

Now what should enterprises expect on top of the “basics?”

  • Visibility: When your workloads are in the cloud, you can’t see them anymore. No longer will you be able to walk through the datacloud gears center and see your racks of servers with blinking lights, but there’s a certain comfort in that, right? So when you move to the cloud, you need to be able to see (ideally in a visual paradigm) the services that you’re using to run your critical workloads
  • Be Proactive: It used to be that enterprises only cared if their data center providers/data center guys were just good at being “reactive” (responding to tickets, monitoring apps and servers, escalating issues, etc). But now the cloud allows us to be proactive. How can you optimize your infrastructure so you actually use less, rather than more? Wouldn’t it be great if your IT operations guy came to you and said “Hey, we can decrease our footprint and lessen our spend,” rather than the other way around?
  • Partner with the business: Now that your workloads are running in the cloud, your IT ops team can focus more on working with the business/applications teams to understand better how the infrastructure can work for them, again rather than the other way around, and they can educate the business/applications teams on how some of the newest cloud services, like elasticity, big data, unstructured data, auto-scaling, etc., can cause the business to think differently and innovate faster.

 

Enterprises should – and are – raising their expectations as they relate to managing their workloads in the cloud. Why? Because the cloud provides a more flexible, powerful, and scalable paradigm than the typical hardware-centric, data center-focused approach.

-Keith Carlson, EVP of Professional and Managed Workload Services

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