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So You Think You Can DevOps?

We recently took a DevOps poll of 1,000 IT professionals to get a pulse for where the industry sits regarding the adoption and completeness of vision around DevOps.  The results were pretty interesting, and overall we are able to deduce that a large majority of the organizations who answered the survey are not truly practicing DevOps.  Part of this may be due to the lack of clarity on what DevOps really is.  I’ll take a second to summarize it as succinctly as possible here.

DevOps is the practice of operations and development engineers participating together in the entire service lifecycle, from design through the development process to production support. This includes, but is not limited to, the culture, tools, organization, and practices required to accomplish this amalgamated methodology of delivering IT services.

credit: https://theagileadmin.com/what-is-devops/

In order to practice DevOps you must be in a DevOps state of mind and embrace its values and mantras unwaveringly.

The first thing that jumped out at me from our survey was the responses to the question “Within your organization, do separate teams manage infrastructure/operations and application development?”  78.2% of respondents answered “Yes” to that question.  Truly practicing DevOps requires that the infrastructure and applications are managed within the context of the same team, so we can deduce that at least 78.2% of the respondents’ companies are not truly practicing DevOps.  Perhaps they are using some infrastructure-as-code tools, some forms of automation, or even have CI/CD pipelines in place, but those things alone do not define DevOps.

Speaking of infrastructure-as-code… Another question, “How is your infrastructure deployed and managed?” had nearly 60% of respondents answering that they were utilizing infrastructure-as-code tools (e.g. Terraform, Configuration Management, Kubernetes) to manage their infrastructure, which is positive, but shows the disconnect between the use of DevOps tools and actually practicing DevOps (as noted in the previous paragraph). On the other hand, just over 38% of respondents indicated that they are managing infrastructure manually (e.g. through the console), which means not only are they not practicing DevOps they aren’t even managing their infrastructure in a way that will ever be compatible with DevOps… yikes.  The good news is that tools like Terraform allow you to import existing manually deployed infrastructure where it can then be managed as code and handled as “immutable infrastructure.”  Manually deploying anything is a DevOps anti-pattern and must be avoided at all costs.

Aside from infrastructure we had several questions around application development and deployment as it pertains to DevOps.  Testing code appears to be an area where a majority of respondents are staying proactive in a way that would be beneficial to a DevOps practice.  The question “What is your approach to writing tests?” had the following breakdown on its answers:

  • We don’t really test:  10.90%
  • We get to it if/when we have time:  15.20%
  • We require some percentage of code to be covered by tests before it is ready for production:  32.10%
  • We require comprehensive unit and integration testing before code is pushed to production:  31.10%
  • Rigid TDD/BDD/ATDD/STDD approach – write tests first & develop code to meet those test requirements:  10.70%

We can see that around 75% of respondents are doing some form of consistent testing, which will go a long way in helping build out a DevOps practice, but a staggering 25% of respondents have little or no testing of code in place today (ouch!).  Another question “How is application code deployed and managed?” shows that around 30% of respondents are using a completely manual process for application deployment and the remaining 70% are using some form of an automated pipeline.  Again, the 70% is a positive sign for those wanting to embrace DevOps, but there is still a massive chunk at 30% who will have to build out automation around testing, building, and deploying code.

Another important factor in managing services the DevOps way is to have all your environments mirror each other.  In response to the question “How well do your environments (e.g. dev, test, prod) mirror one another?” around 28% of respondents indicated that their environments are managed completely independently of each other.  Another 47% indicated that “they share some portion of code but are not managed through identical code bases and processes,” and the remaining 25% are doing it properly by “managed identically using same code & processes employing variables to differentiate environments.”  Lots of room for improvement in this area when organizations decide they are ready to embrace the DevOps way.

Our last question in the survey was “How are you notified when an application/process/system fails?” and I found the answers a bit staggering.  Over 21% of respondents indicated that they are notified of outages by the end user.  It’s pretty surprising to see that large of a percentage utilizing such a reactionary method of service monitoring.  Another 32% responded that “someone in operation is watching a dashboard,” which isn’t as surprising but will definitely be something that needs to be addressed when shifting to a DevOps approach.  Another 23% are using third-party tools like NewRelic and Pingdom to monitor their apps.  Once again, we have that savvy ~25% group who are currently operating in a way that bodes well for DevOps adoption by answering “Monitoring is built into the pipeline, apps and infrastructure. Notifications are sent immediately.”  The twenty-five-percenters are definitely on the right path if they aren’t already practicing DevOps today.

In summary, we have been able to deduce from our survey that, at best, around 25% of the respondents are actually engaging in a DevOps practice today. For more details on the results of our survey, download our infographic.

-Ryan Kennedy, Principal Cloud Automation Architect

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Cloud Automation Increases Agility

In April 2017, we sponsored an online survey focused on cloud automation in order to understand if—and how—corporate IT departments are using automation to develop and deliver new workloads and applications. More than 1,000 IT professionals from US companies with at least 1,000 employees participated in the survey. The majority of respondents (56%) said that at least half of their deployment pipelines are now automated, and 63% said they can deploy new applications in less than six weeks.

According to the results of the survey, companies that have embraced cloud automation can deploy new applications and workloads faster and more frequently, while recovering from failures with more agility than organizations that struggle to adopt automated processes, ing and monitoring. Furthermore, per the survey results, 41% of corporate IT departments are producing more than 10 new cloud workloads every year, and 56% have automated at least half of all their artifact creation and deployment pipelines. Another 66% said that at least half of all their quality assessments (lint, unit s, etc.) are automated.

“The survey results reiterate what we’re hearing from clients and prospects: automation, driven by cloud technologies, is critical to the rapid delivery of new workloads and applications,” says Jeff Aden, EVP of Marketing & Strategic Business Development & Co-Founder at 2nd Watch. “Companies are automating everything from artifact creation to deployment pipelines and process, which includes metrics, documentation and data. The result is faster time-to-market for new applications, and less application downtime.”

More survey results:

  • 63% said that deploying new applications takes less than six weeks
  • 44% said that deploying new code to production takes a day or less
  • 54% said they are deploying new code changes at least once a week
  • 50% said it takes a day or less to recover from application failure
  • 55% said they are measuring application quality by ing everything

 

Download the infographic highlighting the results of the Cloud Automation survey here.  For questions about how 2nd Watch can help you embrace cloud automation, please contact us today!

 

-Katie Laas-Ellis, Marketing Manager, 2nd Watch

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New Survey: Enterprise IT Procurement Patterns Favor Cloud Technologies

We’re back with more survey results! Our la survey of more than 400 IT executives shows that enterprise IT procurement patterns favor cloud technologies, although most execs polled still see themselves as operating “Mode 1” type IT organizations – we’ll get into an explanation of this below. Our Public Cloud Procurement: Packaging, Consumption and Management survey sought to understand the organizational emphasis and strategic focus of modern enterprise IT departments based on the tech services they’re consuming and how much they’re spending.

Gartner refers to Mode 1 organizations as traditional and sequential, emphasizing safety and accuracy and preferring entire solutions over self-service, while Mode 2 organizations are exploratory and nonlinear, emphasize agility and speed, prefer self-service and have a higher tolerance for risk. Going into the survey, we expected most enterprise IT organizations to be bimodal, with their focus split between stability and agility. The results confirmed our expectations – bimodal IT is common for modern IT organizations.

Here are some of our findings:

  • 71% of respondents reported being a Mode 1 IT organizations.
  • 72% of respondents emphasize sequential processes and linear relationships (Mode 1) over short feedback loops and clustered relationships (Mode 2) for IT delivery.
  • 65% said plan-driven / top-down decision making best represented their planning processes – a Mode 1 viewpoint.

However, respondents also showed considerable interest in public cloud technologies and outsourced management for those services:

  • 89% of respondents use AWS, Google Compute Engine or Microsoft Azure.
  • 39% have dedicated up to 25% of total IT spend to public cloud.
  • 43% spend at least half of their cloud service budget on AWS.

Many respondents found the process of buying, consuming and managing public cloud services difficult. A large majority would pay a premium if thatprocess of buying public cloud was easier, and 40% went so far as to say they’d be willing to pay 15% over cost for the benefit of an easier process.

Read the full survey results or download the infographic for a visual representation.

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Survey Shows Cloud Tech Driving Digital Business, Customer Service

In an effort to better understand the relationship between cloud computing and digital business in large enterprises, we have just completed a survey of 498 IT and business executives in the US, our most comprehensive research to date. The survey uncovered a stronger than expected connection between cloud technologies and digital sales and marketing programs. Half of all persons responding to the survey said that moving to the cloud would be their most important digital initiative in 2015.

Digital business has come to define a wave of applications and services that, in Gartner’s words, “blur the physical and digital worlds.” Millions of Internet-connected devices have created new ways for companies to engage customers and prospects, from social marketing campaigns to mobile loyalty apps. Cloud technologies, with their flexibility and affordability, are considered foundational to digital business, and yet many companies are still struggling with operational blockades like inflexible systems.

Nevertheless, cloud computing seems to be driving the digital enterprise. Nearly 59% of respondents to this la survey reported they’re using a combination of on-premise and cloud technologies to power digital business initiatives, while 22% of companies follow a “cloud first” methodology. The survey also asked about specific initiatives. The majority (36%) of persons responding said that between 25% and 50% of their digital sales and marketing services will leverage cloud-computing technologies this year, and almost a quarter (24%) will leverage cloud technologies for 50% to 75% of digital sales and marketing programs. Many companies are also using cloud-based tools to measure time to deployment for new digital programs (54%), the cost of said programs (48%), ROI (43%), and automation (33%).

Other digital business survey highlights:

  • 60% said cloud tools will support digital sales and marketing programs this year
  • 36% said understanding cloud was their most important consideration when going digital, followed by creating a roadmap of business and tech initiatives (25%) and cultural change (20%)
  • 38% said improving customer service was their company’s top driver for leveraging new cloud technologies, while 27% said the top driver was increasing revenue
  • 35% said more than half their budget this year would go toward digital campaigns
  • 44% said it takes up to three months to provision new infrastructure for complex applications
  • 52% said developing and deploying new digital programs rapidly and to scale was the primary advantage to using cloud technologies; 50% said cost savings was the primary advantage (respondents could select multiple answers to this question)

The results of the la survey show pretty clearly that companies are thinking about cloud technologies more strategically than just a year or two ago.  Enterprises are also seeing private cloud not providing the benefits it claimed in the last few years and thus are more likely moving to the public cloud.

Cloud computing is no longer simply an infrastructure play but a set of business-oriented capabilities that companies are using to better serve customers, be more agile and grow sales.  Enterprises are also requiring that the providers they are selecting must have critical capabilities for common workloads.

-Jeff Aden, EVP BD & Marketing

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