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The Most Popular AWS Products of 2016

We know from the past 5 years of Gartner Magic Quadrants that AWS is a leader among IaaS vendors, placing the furthest for ‘completeness of vision’ and ‘ability to execute.’ AWS’ rapid pace of innovation contributes to its position as the leader in the space. The cloud provider releases hundreds of product and service updates every year. So, which of those are the most popular amongst our enterprise clients?

We analyzed data from our customers for the year, from a combined 100,000+ instances running monthly. The most popular AWS products and services, represented by the percentage of 2nd Watch customers utilizing them in 2016, include Amazon’s two core services for compute and storage – EC2 and S3 – and Amazon Data Transfer, each at 100% usage. Other high-ranking products include Simple Queue Service (SQS) for message queuing (84%) and Amazon Relational Database Service or RDS (72%). Usage for these services remains fairly consistent, and we would expect to see these services across most AWS deployments.

There are some relatively new AWS products and services that made the “most-popular” list for 2016 as well. AWS Lambda serverless computing (38%), Amazon WorkSpaces, a secure virtual desktop service (27%), and Kinesis, a real-time streaming data platform (12%), are quickly being adopted by AWS users and rising in popularity.

The fas-growing services in 2016, based on CAGR, include AWS CloudTrail (48%), Kinesis (30%), Config for resource inventory, configuration history, and change notifications (24%), Elasticsearch Service for real-time search and analytics (22%), Elastic MapReduce, a tool for big data processing and analysis, (20%) and Redshift, the data warehouse service alternative to systems from HP, Oracle and IBM (14%).

The accelerated use of these products demonstrates how quickly new cloud technologies are becoming the standard in today’s evolving market. Enterprises are moving away from legacy systems to cloud platforms for everything from back-end systems to business-critical, consumer-facing assets. We expect growth in each of these categories to continue as large organizations realize the benefits and ease of using these technologies.

Download the 30 Most Popular AWS Products infographic to find out which others are in high-demand.

-Jeff Aden, Co-Founder & EVP Business Development & Marketing

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2nd Watch AWS Scorecard

Check out our new AWS Scorecard for a look at what we’re seeing companies typically use for their cloud services. Taken from AWS usage trends among 2nd Watch customers for July-October, 2014.

2ndWatch-AWSscorecard-final

Download the Scorecard

Scorecard Highlights:

Organizations using Amazon EC2 are typically broken down in the following percentages:

  • 38% use Small instances
  • 19% use Medium
  • 15% use XLarge
  • The very large (which include 2XLarge, 4XLarge and 8XLarge),  and the very small (Micro) account for only  27% collectively.

 

Among our customers:

  • 94% use Amazon’s Simple Storage Service (S3)
  • 66% use Amazon’s Simple Notification Service (SNS) for push messaging
  • 41% use Amazon’s Relational Database Service (RDS) to set up, operate, and scale a relational database in the cloud.

 

Around three-quarters of customers run Linux instances, with the remaining using Windows. However Windows systems accounted for 31% of all computing hours, and more money is typically spent on Windows instances.

 

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AWS Lowers Cloud Computing Costs AGAIN

Last week, AWS announced their 42nd price reduction since 2008. This significant cut impacts many of their most popular services including EC2, S3, EMR, RDS and ElastiCache. These savings range from 10% to 65%, depending on the service you use.  As you can see from the example below, this customer scenario results in savings of almost $150,000 annually, which represents a 36% savings on these services!!!

This major move not only helps existing AWS users but makes the value proposition of shifting from on-premise to the AWS cloud even greater.  If you are not on AWS now, contact us to learn how we can help you take advantage of this new pricing and everything AWS has to offer.

As an AWS Premier Consulting Partner, our mission is to get you migrated to and running efficiently in the Amazon Web Services (AWS) cloud. The journey to get into the AWS cloud can be complicated, but we’ll guide you along the way and take it from there, so you can concentrate on running your business rather than your IT infrastructure.

2nd Watch provides:

  • Fast and Flawless enterprise grade cloud migration
  • Cloud IT Operations Management that goes beyond basic infrastructure management
  • Cloud cost/usage tracking and analytics that helps you control and allocate costs across your enterprise

AWS Price Reduction_TimH

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Increasing Your Cloud Footprint

The jump to the cloud can be a scary proposition.  For an enterprise with systems deeply embedded in traditional infrastructure like back office computer rooms and datacenters the move to the cloud can be daunting. The thought of having all of your data in someone else’s hands can make some IT admins cringe.  However, once you start looking into cloud technologies you start seeing some of the great benefits, especially with providers like Amazon Web Services (AWS).  The cloud can be cost-effective, elastic and scalable, flexible, and secure.  That same IT admin cringing at the thought of their data in someone else’s hands may finally realize that AWS is a bit more secure than a computer rack sitting under an employee’s desk in a remote office.  Once the decision is finally made to “try out” the cloud, the planning phase can begin.

Most of the time the biggest question is, “How do we start with the cloud?”  The answer is to use a phased approach.  By picking applications and workloads that are less mission critical, you can try the newest cloud technologies with less risk.  When deciding which workloads to move, you should ask yourself the following questions; Is there a business need for moving this workload to the cloud?  Is the technology a natural fit for the cloud?  What impact will this have on the business? If all those questions are suitably answered, your workloads will be successful in the cloud.

One great place to start is with archiving and backups.  These types of workloads are important, but the data you’re dealing with is likely just a copy of data you already have, so it is considerably less risky.  The easiest way to start with archives and backups is to try out S3 and Glacier.  Many of today’s backup utilities you may already be using, like Symantec Netbackup  and Veeam Backup & Replication, have cloud versions that can directly backup to AWS. This allows you to use start using the cloud without changing much of your embedded backup processes.  By moving less critical workloads you are taking the first steps in increasing your cloud footprint.

Now that you have moved your backups to AWS using S3 and Glacier, what’s next?  The next logical step would be to try some of the other services AWS offers.  Another workload that can often be moved to the cloud is Disaster Recovery.   DR is an area that will allow you to more AWS services like VPC, EC2, EBS, RDS, Route53 and ELBs.  DR is a perfect way to increase your cloud footprint because it will allow you to construct your current environment, which you should already be very familiar with, in the cloud.  A Pilot Light DR solution is one type of DR solution commonly seen in AWS.  In the Pilot Light scenario the DR site has minimal systems and resources with the core elements already configured to enable rapid recovery once a disaster happens.  To build a Pilot Light DR solution you would create the AWS network infrastructure (VPC), deploy the core AWS building blocks needed for the minimal Pilot Light configuration (EC2, EBS, RDS, and ELBs), and determine the process for recovery (Route53).  When it is time for recovery all the other components can be quickly provisioned to give you a fully working environment. By moving DR to the cloud you’ve increased your cloud footprint even more and are on your way to cloud domination!

The next logical step is to move Test and Dev environments into the cloud. Here you can get creative with the way you use the AWS technologies.  When building systems on AWS make sure to follow the Architecting Best Practices: Designing for failure means nothing will fail, decouple your components, take advantage of elasticity, build security into every layer, think parallel, and don’t fear constraints! Start with proof-of-concept (POC) to the development environment, and use AWS reference architecture to aid in the learning and planning process.  Next your legacy application in the new environment and migrate data.  The POC is not complete until you validate that it works and performance is to your expectations.  Once you get to this point, you can reevaluate the build and optimize it to exact specifications needed. Finally, you’re one step closer to deploying actual production workloads to the cloud!

Production workloads are obviously the most important, but with the phased approach you’ve taken to increase your cloud footprint, it’s not that far of a jump from the other workloads you now have running in AWS.   Some of the important things to remember to be successful with AWS include being aware of the rapid pace of the technology (this includes improved services and price drops), that security is your responsibility as well as Amazon’s, and that there isn’t a one-size-fits-all solution.  Lastly, all workloads you implement in the cloud should still have stringent security and comprehensive monitoring as you would on any of your on-premises systems.

Overall, a phased approach is a great way to start using AWS.  Start with simple services and traditional workloads that have a natural fit for AWS (e.g. backups and archiving).  Next, start to explore other AWS services by building out environments that are familiar to you (e.g. DR). Finally, experiment with POCs and the entire gambit of AWS to benefit for more efficient production operations.  Like many new technologies it takes time for adoption. By increasing your cloud footprint over time you can set expectations for cloud technologies in your enterprise and make it a more comfortable proposition for all.

-Derek Baltazar, Senior Cloud Engineer

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Enabling Growth and Watching the Price

One of the main differentiators between traditional on premise data centers and Cloud Computing through AWS is the speed at which businesses can scale their environment.  So often in enterprise environments, IT and business struggle to have adequate capacity when they need it.  Facilities run out of power and cooling, vendors cannot provide systems fast enough or the same type of system is not available, and business needs sometimes come without warning.  AWS scales out to meet these demands in every area.

Compute capacity is expanded, often automatically with auto scaling groups, which add additional server instances as demands dictate.  With auto scaling groups, demands on the environment cause more systems to come online.  Even without auto scaling, systems can be cloned with Amazon Machine Images (AMIs) and started to meet capacity, expand to a new region/geography, or even be shared with a business partner to move collaboration forward.

Beyond compute capacity, storage capacity is a few mouse clicks (or less) away from business needs as well.  Using Amazon S3, storage capacity is simply allocated as it is used dynamically.  Customers do not need to do anything more than add content and storage, and that is far easier than adding disk arrays!  With Elastic Block Storage (EBS), these are added as quickly as compute instances are.  Storage can be added and attached to live instances or replicated across an environment as capacity is demanded.

Growth is great, and we’ve written a great deal about how to take advantage of the elastic nature of AWS before, but what about the second part of the title?  Price!  It’s no secret that as customers use more AWS resources, the price increases.  The more you use, the more you pay; simple.  The differentiators come into play with that same elastic nature; when demand drops, resources can be released and costs saved.  Auto scaling can retire instances as easily as it adds them, storage can be removed when no longer needed, and with usage of resources, bills can actually shrink as you become more proficient in AWS.  (Of course, 2ndWatch Managed Services can also help with that proficiency!)  With traditional data centers, once resources are purchased, you pay the price (often a large one). With the Cloud, resources can be purchased as needed, at just a fraction of the price.

IT wins and business wins – enterprise level computing at its best!

-Keith Homewood, Cloud Architect

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