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While the weather in Vegas turned cold and rainy yesterday, the enthusiasm for the conference remained bright.

Summit Keynote

Werner Vogels, Amazon’s CTO, with the help of his Amazon Alexa, started the day off walking us through his journey from his worst day at AWS to his best.

His worst involved an on-prem database that couldn’t scale to meet their needs.  This lead to the creation of Aurora, the fastest growing service in AWS since its release.  Leave it to AWS to solve a database problem by building a better database from the ground up.  This led to purpose built DBs such as RDS, DynomoDB, Elasticache and Neptune.

His best day, not surprisingly, is the day they moved their largest data warehouse off Oracle to Redshift.

AWS’ scalable and reliable infrastructure were the main themes of these stories.  This laid the groundwork for the new announcements centering around serverless.  Vogels wants to free customers from having to worry about the underlying infrastructure.  His favorite keynote was when he announced Lambda in 2014.

New Announcements

Vogels stated that 95% of AWS features are built based on customer feedback, which lead to the following new announcements:

Amazon Redshift concurrency scaling: An improvement on the existing product that provides consistently fast responses to queries even when there are thousands of concurrent users and queries.  This is available for preview today.  You can sign up on the Redshift page.

AWS Toolkits for popular IDEs:  New toolkits for PyCharm, IntelliJ (Preview), and Visual Studio Code (Preview).

Lambda now supports Ruby:  You can now develop your AWS Lambda function code using Ruby.

Lambda Runtime API:  Allows you to bring your own language to Lambda.  No more language limitations.

Lambda Layers:  Provides the ability to store and version commonly-used code for easier reuse. Partners are already providing layers you can use.

Nested Applications Using Serverless Application Repository:  This allows you to compose an application from reusable building blocks. New architectures are a set of nested serverless applications.

Step Functions service integrations:  This allows you to connect to AWS services without having to write customer code. Currently this supports eight AWS services; Batch, ECS, Fargate, Glue, DynamoDB, SNS, SQS, and SageMaker.

ALB Support for Lambda:  Users can now have stateful HTTP access serverless applications.  This could allow applications that are server-based to be moved to Lambda functions without affecting the end user.

Amazon Managed Streaming for Kafka:  Kafka is an open-sourced data streaming tool and can be hard to manage and set-up.  AWS wants to take over this burden for you by providing a managed service.

AWS Well-Architected tool: Well-Architected reviews have been around for some time, and I have conducted a few myself. As you can imagine, AWS and its partners don’t have enough resources to help customers conduct these reviews.  Starting today, the automated tools are available for you do this this review yourself.

Sessions and Events

Yesterday was another full day of sessions, including some covering the new announcements from Jassy and Vogels.  As my colleague stated yesterday, if you missed a session, you can stream it on-demand later on the AWS re:Invent YouTube channel.

The night wound up with not-to-be-missed AWS re:PLAY with music by Skrillex.

Yesterday was also the final day of the Expo, and we at 2nd Watch hope you got a chance to stop by our booth to say hi.  Over the week, we had the pleasure of talking to cloud consumers from all over the world.  Regardless of location and industry, we all enjoyed solving technical challenges with AWS services.

Hope everyone had a great time and safe travels!

Larry Cusick – Solutions Architect

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